fbpx

How to Make Gluten Free Sourdough Bread!

{Just like the real thing Gluten Free Sourdough Bread}

This recipe guide includes step by step videos that take you through how to make a gluten free sourdough bread loaf the easy way! Each part of the recipe is broken down into easy steps. You can then use this as a guide to not only follow other recipes and sourdough formulas but also create your own variations!

This incredibly easy to follow gluten free sourdough recipe includes follow along videos that will show you how to make a gluten free sourdough bread loaf from scratch! This gluten free sourdough recipe is vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter and baking a beautiful gluten free artisan sourdough break loaf! gluten free sourdough bread recipe, sourdough bread recipe, sourdough, gluten free sourdough, gluten free baking.
Jump to Recipe Jump to Video Print Recipe Leave a COMMENT

Still don’t have a gluten free sourdough starter? No worries! I’ve got you covered. Just go to my intuitive guide to making a gluten free sourdough starter and start making yours from scratch today!

You’ll love how easy making this bread becomes with my follow-along videos. Please contact me in the comments below if you have any questions at all. I believe we are a community, lets help one another in our gluten free sourdough journeys!

Hugs from Trish

CONTENTS

  1. WHAT ARE THE 6-STEPS TO GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD
  2. INGREDIENTS IN GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD
    • LEAVEN
    • SOAKER
    • GEL
    • STARCHES
  3. MATERIALS LIST – the essentials you need to bake gluten free sourdough bread
  4. 6-STEPS TO MAKE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD – in action (with videos)
    • REACTIVATE & REPLENISH YOUR STARTER
    • MIX LEAVEN
    • MIX SOAKER & GEL
    • ADD STARCHES
    • REST & CHILL
    • SCORE & BAKE
  5. FREE BAKING TIMELINE
  6. PIN THIS RECIPE TO PINTEREST – for later use
  7. HOW TO FREEZE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD
  8. WHY YOU NEED TO WEIGH THE INGREDIENTS

6-STEPS TO GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD (defined)

I like to break things down into easy to remember parts when creating a recipe. So I have created an easy 6 STEP process to making my gluten free sourdough bread with 4 components (bolded below) that make up the dough. I’ll go into detail of each of these steps & components below.

6-STEPS to Gluten Free Sourdough Bread

STEP 1: Reactivate & Replenish starter

STEP 2: Mix LEAVEN

STEP 3: Mix SOAKER & GEL

STEP 4: Add STARCHES & mix dough

STEP 5: Rest & Chill

STEP 6: Bake your gluten free sourdough bread!

4 Components of Gluten Free Dough

  1. LEAVEN – created with our active starter
  2. SOAKER – mixture of whole grains & liquid
  3. GEL – binder & liquid
  4. STARCHES – mixture of two starches

INGREDIENTS

(in Gluten Free Sourdough Bread)

Not sure if your starter is active or healthy enough to bake gluten free sourdough bread?

Please check out my “How to make a Gluten Free Sourdough Starter” video series that will help you figure it all out!

This incredibly easy to follow video series is a daily follow along that will show you how to make a gluten free sourdough starter from scratch! I'll also show you how to make a wheat sourdough starter from scratch! With this starter, you can create all sorts of incredible bakes that are vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter, whether it's gluten free or not! sourdough baking, sourdough starter, gluten free sourdough starter, glutenfreesourdough, gfvegan, gfvbaking

The absolute KEY to making a great loaf of gluten free sourdough bread is having a very healthy & active gluten free sourdough starter culture! Without it, forget about it! The loaf will lack both rise & open crumb and will be heavy and dense like a brick!

Don’t have a gluten free sourdough starter yet?

Are you hoping to make a gluten free sourdough starter culture? Then you’ve come to the right place! My follow-along video series will take you through the process from start to baking your 1st loaf and everything in between! I share with you my intuitive approach to creating & maintaining your gluten free sourdough starter in order to take away the mystery of sourdough baking! Join me here!

1. INGREDIENTS IN THE LEAVEN

(used to leaven our gluten free sourdough bread)

This incredibly easy to follow video series is a daily follow along that will show you how to make a gluten free sourdough starter from scratch! I'll also show you how to make a wheat sourdough starter from scratch! With this starter, you can create all sorts of incredible bakes that are vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter, whether it's gluten free or not! sourdough baking, sourdough starter, gluten free sourdough starter, glutenfreesourdough, gfvegan, gfvbaking

WHAT IS A LEAVEN?

After its been reactivated & has peaked, the STARTER is used to create a LEAVEN. The LEAVEN (aka preferment or active starter) is an active starter that has been kept at room temperature & freshly fed to reach peak activity and is used to LEAVEN your bake! See below for more details.

WHAT’S IN THE LEAVEN?

  1. Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

This can be either starter that has been maintained in the refrigerator or starter that has been regularly fed at room temperature. As long as the starter is healthy, vital and active! The sourdough starter is the biological leavening agent in this recipe and will give your gluten free sourdough bread a lovely rise and fluffy texture! If you don’t have a starter yet and would love to make one, please check out my follow along video guide that will make creating a gluten free sourdough starter easy for you!

  1. Warm Water

Make sure the water is either filtered or tap water that has sat on the counter for at least 24 hours.

The most ideal Water temperature to promote yeast activity is between 105-115°F (40.6-46.1°C). In fact, yeast dies at 130-140°F. So if you place your sourdough starter in water >140°F the yeast will be killed off and your dough will not rise properly. Inversely, yeast in water <100°F will create a very sticky dough that will not rise as well either. It is totally worth investing in a kitchen thermometer for this purpose. If your room temperature water is very cold, simply give it a quick warm up!

  1. Superfine Brown Rice Flour

Brown Rice Flour is made by finely grinding short grain brown rice. It is best if it is superfine, however, for a lot of us it is difficult to get our hot little hands on! Unless we buy it online of course. So I blend mine to as superfine as I can if I can’t buy superfine. I like Bob’s Red Mill Brown Rice Flour as it is stone ground to a very fine texture. To make this flour superfine, I simply blend it in my high speed blender. It does the trick!

2. INGREDIENTS IN THE SOAKER

(used to soak the whole grains in our gluten free sourdough bread)

The SOAKER is one of the key components used to make gluten free sourdough bread. gluten free sourdough, sourdough, glutenfreesourdoughrecipe, gluten free sourdough recipe, sourdough recipe

WHAT IS A SOAKER?

Used to allow grains to absorb some of the water before the dough is mixed. It is basically an AUTOLYSE. “Auto” means something that happens all on its own, and “-lyse” means to break something down. During this soaker period, the proteins in the whole grains are broken down into smaller segments due to the natural enzymes & microorganisms present on the flour. We “SOAK” the whole grains before we add the starches. Starches are VERY water absorbent so if you don’t make a soaker, the starch will absorb so much water that the whole grains will not get a chance to break down as much!

WHAT’S IN THE SOAKER?

  1. Whole Grain Flours
  • Brown Rice Flour (superfine)
  • Sorghum Flour
  • White Rice Flour
  • You can find Sorghum Flour & White Rice Flour at most grocers and health stores (e.g. Blush Lane Organics & Community Health Foods in Calgary).
  • I include the white rice flour in my soaker although it is not a whole grain.
  1. Water

See note above.

3. INGREDIENTS IN THE GEL

(used to bind the dough together = gluten replacer)

The GEL is one of the key components used to make gluten free sourdough bread. gluten free sourdough, sourdough, glutenfreesourdoughrecipe, gluten free sourdough recipe, sourdough recipe

WHAT IS A GEL?

Unfortunately, it is the gluten proteins in regular sourdough that bind the ingredients together. Since our gluten free flours don’t contain gluten, we need to figure out another way to bind the ingredients. Using some very healthy binders found in nature we can do just that!

I also add some enrichment to this dough by increasing the fat content slightly with olive oil. If you don’t like this you can try omitting the oil and substituting more water.

Adding a few key ingredients: apple cider vinegar, pure maple syrup, and aquafaba, help to rise the dough and bind it together. See below for more!

WHAT’S IN THE GEL?

What is psyllium husk?

  1. Psylliym Husk (whole)

Psyllium Husk is very rich in fibre &is incredibly good for the intestinal tract. In fact, it enhances the digestive process, can help improve & prevent constipation and haemorrhoid pain & has prebiotic effects. Research is even showing it can help manage diabetes and may even lower risk of developing diabetes! On top of all of that psyllium husk is heart healthy, may help decrease blood pressure, decrease cholesterol & can help with weight management. It contains antibacterial compounds that help eliminate toxins in the body & in turn give you healthy glowing skin! You can find whole psyllium husk at most grocers and health stores (e.g. Blush Lane Organics & Community Health Foods in Calgary).

What is aquafaba?

  1. Aquafaba (liquid from chickpeas)
Aquafaba is the liquid from soaked chickpeas. It is used like an egg replacer to bind ingredients together. egg replacer, binders for gluten free baking

You can either use dried chickpeas and soak them in water overnight or drain a can of chickpeas. Aquafaba acts like an egg does in baking and helps bind the ingredients together beautifully. This is an optional ingredient and will make your loaf much fluffier & lighter. If you don’t like that texture, just omit & replace the aquafaba with the equal amount of water!

  1. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is used to strengthen the dough. I like to use Bragg’s raw unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar for its purity and flavour.

  1. Olive Oil

Extra Virgin Olive Oil adds moisture and a boost of heart healthy fats. My favourite is this brand which I get at Costco. Just a little oil, softens the dough & gives it a fluffier texture. This dough enrichment is optional. If you prefer your bread less fluffy, simply omit the oil & replace with more water.

  1. Maple Syrup

Pure maple syrup is a true Canadian delicacy! It gives more food for the yeast, increasing activity and always lends an incredible flavour!

  1. Salt

Either a nice sea salt or kosher salt lends a good flavour to the dough. We don’t add the salt to the soaker as it slows down fermentation.

4. INGREDIENTS – STARCHES

(used to help give rise to the dough & bind)

Gluten-Free Flours

WHY ADD STARCHES?

Unfortunately, once again it is the gluten proteins in regular sourdough that not only combines ingredients together but also create a network of bonds that hold the CO2 gas and create the lift in the dough.

So as always, us gluten free folk need to find another way to replace that darn gluten!

Adding starches allows the dough to absorb more water which helps bind the dough. Gluten free flours are missing the moisture retention abilities that gluten containing flours have.

TYPES OF STARCHES

  1. Potato Starch

Potato Starch is a starchy flour that helps bind. However, Potato Starch is NOT the same thing as Potato Flour. Potato starch is a natural way to increase the moisture of the dough as potato starch absorbs and holds liquid. You can find Potato Starch at most grocery stores in the organic/natural foods aisle. I use Bob’s Red Mill.

  1. Tapioca Flour (aka Tapioca Starch)

Like other starches, Tapioca Flour (aka Tapioca starch) is a very fine white powder that comes from the pulp of the cassava plant. It is not the same thing as cassava flour, however, which is made from the entire root of the cassava plant. You can find Tapioca Flour at most grocery stores in the organic/natural foods aisle.

CAN I SUBSTITUTE THESE STARCHES?

Either of these starches can be replaced by arrowroot powder if you can not consume potato or tapioca. Having more than one starch allows for a more complex flavour & better rise as each has different properties.

MATERIALS LIST – GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD

This incredibly easy to follow gluten free sourdough recipe includes follow along videos that will show you how to bake a delicious & beautiful artisan gluten free sourdough bread loaf from scratch! This gluten free sourdough bread is vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter, and creating a gorgeous loaf of gluten free artisan sourdough bread! sourdough baking, sourdough starter, gluten free sourdough starter, glutenfreesourdough, gfvegan, gfvbaking
MATERIALS NEEDED TO BAKE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD

6-STEPS TO GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD

If you’re like me and dearly missed either eating or baking your own sourdough, or both, you’re going to love this recipe! This recipe contains starches, if you’re looking for a sourdough recipe with less starch, please check out my other sourdough formulas (coming soon) that contain very little or no starch! The step-by-step videos make each step easy! Check it out 👇🏻

STEP 1a: REACTIVATE YOUR STARTER

(Evening before want to bake gluten free sourdough bread)

Tonight we will feed our starters to prepare it to make a leaven TOMORROW! You can use cold starter that has been in the refrigerator or warm starter that has been on the counter & fed daily.

Say you want to bake on Saturday for example, you will feed your starter on Friday evening. Depending on your starters environment, it will peak either overnight or the next morning. If you find your starter is slower (e.g. in a colder climate), simply increase the Starter : Feed ratio, basically keep more starter & feed it less! For instance, you could take 30g starter and feed it 75g flour & 75g water. The reverse is also true for a hot environment.

STARTER READINESS CHECKLIST

Follow my starter readiness checklist to decide when your sourdough starter is at its peak rise and ready to mix your leaven! 👇🏻

I often feed my starter the 1:5:5 ratio (the evening before) and if it has not peaked by morning, I place it in my oven with the light on to speed things up! Once your starter is at its peak, it’s time to mix your LEAVEN!

HOW TO FEED STARTER (REACTIVATE) TO PREP IT FOR BAKING

STEP 1: EVENING PRIOR TO BAKING – Reactivate Starter

SUMMARY

* Remember if you are using a sorghum flour starter you can feed it sorghum flour for this feed but it will need an additional 5-10g of water to achieve the right consistency. You can also feed ANY type of starter as above with your superfine brown rice flour!

If you’re not having much activity in your sourdough starter, please watch the below 👇🏻 video for more tips!

STEP 1b: REPLENISH STARTER

(Morning of BAKE DAY – time to refrigerate your starter)

Once your starter is at its PEAK ACTIVITY, like we reviewed last night…then it’s time to mix our leaven & replenish our starters to prepare them to go into the refrigerator! If you want to bake again the following day, go ahead and keep your starter at room temperature! Putting the starter in the refrigerator slows down the fermentation significantly!

HOW TO REPLENISH YOUR STARTER

The best way to maintain your starter is in the refrigerator. I call the starter that I keep in the fridge my “Mother Starter”. When you’re planning to bake, take the mother starter out of the fridge the evening before you’d like to bake with it. Then, remove some of your starter (in this case we used 15g) & feed to reactivate it (as above). It will then be prepped & active again!

THE “MOTHER STARTER”

The left over “mother starter” should now be replenished (fed) prior to going back into the refrigerator. Never put your “mother starter” to bed hungry! I always “replenish, rest, refrigerate” my mother starter. After I feed it to replenish, I let it rest on the counter for about 1 hour, then refrigerate.

This is much easier than it sounds! Watch the video below to clarify! I will also explain all of this in my post “HOW TO MAINTAIN YOUR SOURDOUGH STARTER“.

HOW TO REPLENISH STARTER – VIDEO

STEP 1B: REPLENISH STARTER & REFRIGERATE

SUMMARY – REPLENISH & REFRIGERATE YOUR STARTER

STEP 2: MIX YOUR LEAVEN (BAKE DAY)

(LEAVEN = preferment = active starter)

When this reactivated STARTER has peaked, I use it to create a LEAVEN. The LEAVEN (aka preferment or active starter) has been kept at room temperature & freshly fed to reach peak activity and is used to LEAVEN your gluten free sourdough dough! I think of it as the “STARTER” starts off the bake & is what I keep as my constant supply. The “LEAVEN” is made when I want to bake & is used to leaven my dough.

The health & vitality of your starter will dictate the power & activity of your leaven! So, keeping your starter as strong, healthy & vital as possible is KEY!

DOES IT MATTER HOW MUCH STARTER & FEED GO INTO MY LEAVEN?

Where a starter is typically fed fairly equal amounts of water & flour (100% hydration), a LEAVEN can be fed at varying levels of hydration to give the flavour complex you are looking for. Varying percentage of STARTER to FEED used to create your LEAVEN will also change the flavour profile & speed at which your LEAVEN is ready to bake.

MORE starter in the leaven

  • faster speed of fermentation
  • less time to peak
  • more sour flavour
  • more acidity due to more bacterial activity

LESS starter in the leaven

  • slower speed of fermentation
  • longer time to peak
  • milder flavour (less sourness)
  • less bacterial activity (less acidity)

CAN I USE MORE OR LESS LEAVEN IN A FORMULA?

Leaven amounts can alter the level of SOURNESS in your dough!

The amount of LEAVEN in a formula will also determine the flavour profile & speed of fermentation of your dough! So knowing this, with a little practice, you can start figuring out the perfect amount of starter within your leaven & the perfect amount of leaven in your dough to meet your tastes & desired schedule! Don’t worry about this now…this is for later!

  • MORE LEAVEN = more sour dough & faster bulk fermentation
  • LESS LEAVEN = more mild sour flavour to dough & slower fermentation

HOW LONG UNTIL I CAN BAKE MY GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH?

Time to mix our LEAVEN (aka preferment). Once your starter has reached its PEAK RISE, mix your leaven & let it do its magic! It will take a good 2-4 hours (more or less depending on the temp of the environment & how much starter is in the leaven) for the leaven to reach its PEAK and be ready to mix your dough!

WHAT AFFECTS THE TIME IT TAKES THE LEAVEN TO PEAK:

  1. Temperature of your starters environment? WARMER = LESS TIME, COLDER = MORE TIME
  2. How has your starter been responding to the previous feeds & ratios? This will give you a hint to how long it will take your leaven to reach its peak rise. The leaven is 1/2 starter : 1/2 feed so it will reach its peak quicker than our feeds that were 1:1:1 ratio!
  3. What is your starters appearance? Rise? Surface appearance? Bubbles? This will help you know what phase of the life cycle your starter is at & how long it will take to peak. See my post on how to make a sourdough starter for more details.

HOW TO MIX YOUR LEAVEN -VIDEO

STEP 2: MIX YOUR LEAVEN

SUMMARY – GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH LEAVEN

STEP 3: MIX THE SOAKER & GEL

(MIX SOAKER & GEL for Gluten Free Sourdough)

The SOAKER is one of the key components used to make gluten free sourdough bread. gluten free sourdough, sourdough, glutenfreesourdoughrecipe, gluten free sourdough recipe, sourdough recipe

WHAT IS A SOAKER?

Used to allow grains to absorb some of the water before the dough is mixed. It is basically an AUTOLYSE. “Auto” means something that happens all on its own, and “-lyse” means to break something down. During this soaker period, the proteins in the whole grains are broken down into smaller segments due to the natural enzymes & microorganisms present on the flour. We “SOAK” the whole grains before we add the starches. Starches are VERY water absorbent so if you don’t make a soaker, the starch will absorb so much water that the whole grains will not get a chance to break down as much!

The GEL is one of the key components used to make gluten free sourdough bread. gluten free sourdough, sourdough, glutenfreesourdoughrecipe, gluten free sourdough recipe, sourdough recipe

WHAT IS A GEL?

Unfortunately, it is the gluten proteins in regular sourdough that bind the ingredients together. Since our gluten free flours don’t contain gluten, we need to figure out another way to bind the ingredients. Using some very healthy binders found in nature we can do just that!

I also add some enrichment to this dough by increasing the fat content slightly with olive oil. If you don’t like this you can try omitting the oil and substituting more water.

I also add a few key ingredients: apple cider vinegar, pure maple syrup, and aquafaba help to rise the dough and bind it together. See above for more details!

HOW TO MIX THE SOAKER & GEL – VIDEO

STEP 3: MIX SOAKER & GEL

STEP 4: ADD STARCHES & MIX DOUGH

(Mix the dough to make Gluten Free Sourdough Bread)

Gluten-Free Flours

WHY ADD STARCHES?

Unfortunately, once again it is the gluten proteins in regular sourdough that not only combines ingredients together but also create a network of bonds that hold the CO2 gas and create the lift in the dough.

So once again, us gluten free folk need to find another way to replace that darn gluten!

Adding starches allows the dough to absorb more water which helps bind the dough. Gluten free flours are missing the moisture retention abilities that gluten containing flours have. For more details see above.

WHY MAKE A SAMPLE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH

I love to create a little sample dough that will allow you to easily watch the progress of your dough’s fermentation. BONUS, you get to eat it while it’s hot and don’t have to wait until your loaf is cool to taste it! I got this idea from Hendrik at “The Bread Code” who has lots of wonderful sourdough videos to watch. They are not gluten free, however, a lot of the principles he speaks of apply to gluten free!

ADD STARCHES & MIX DOUGH – VIDEO

STEP 4: ADD STARCHES & MIX DOUGH

STEP 5: REST & CHILL

(aka BULK FERMENT & COLD FERMENT)

BULK FERMENT (REST)

After we mix our dough, we set it in a warm place to “REST” for about 2-4 hours. Watch the video below for all of my tips to help you decide when the bulk ferment is over. During this time, the dough continues to ferment, just as our starters do. This period is called the “bulk ferment” time. I like to think of it as a rest for the dough. The bulk fermentation is absolutely necessary for our dough to rise & get that iconic sourdough flavour!

COLD FERMENT (CHILL)

The “CHILL” time as I like to call it is called the “cold ferment”. This is when the dough is placed into the refrigerator to develop its flavour profile. Just like when we place our starter in the refrigerator, the fermentation slows down, but doesn’t completely stop. The longer the “CHILL” time the more sour your bread will end up tasting. The “CHILL” is not a necessary step and can vary from 30mins to overnight, to a few days depending on the formula. I find a 30min chill time just before baking, eases the “scoring” process (cut the surface of the dough before baking) and allows a slight flavour development without over fermenting your dough.

DECIDE: WHEN DO YOU WANT TO BAKE?

Do you want to bake today or tomorrow morning? This will help you decide how long your cold ferment will be. If you want to bake today, cover your dough & place it in the refrigerator while your oven heats up. PREHEAT OVEN with dutch oven or baking stone inside for 30-45mins: 475°F (246°C) – convection bake or 500°F (260°C) if you don’t have convection bake).

REST & CHILL – VIDEO

STEP 6: SCORE & BAKE

(SCORE & BAKE Gluten Free Sourdough)

Let’s bake our sourdough! This is the fun part!

STEP 1: PREHEAT OVEN with dutch oven inside for 30-45mins at 475°F (246°C)

Use convection bake. If you don’t have a convection oven, bake at 500°F (260°C) . Place your dutch oven or baking stone inside the oven to preheat.

STEP 2: CHILL DOUGH

Ensure your dough is being chilled in the refrigerator while your oven is preheating. If your dough has been chilling over night, leave it in the refrigerator until the oven is preheated.

STEP 3: SCORE YOUR DOUGH

In the video I do a simple cross hatch score but you can chose whatever score you like. I often do just a simple “C” when I’m running low on time. The importance of scoring the dough is explained in the video.

STEP 4: BAKE DOUGH

  • Turn oven temperature down to 450°F (232°C) convection or 475°F (246°C).
  • Bake for 45mins covered (for a nicely cooked inside. Can cook as little as 35 mins covered if you like your bread really soft).
  • DO NOT cut into it until it is completely cool or the loaf will be gummy inside!
  • Uncover, turn 180°, bake 25-45 mins. Depending on how crispy & dark you like your crust.
  • Remove from oven & cool completely on a wire rack.
  • Cut your loaf once completely cool as the gluten free sourdough really needs the cooling time to set completely. I usually leave it to cool at least 3 hours or even overnight.

STEP 5: BAKE YOUR SAMPLE DOUGH

While your loaf is baking remember to bake your sample dough on a baking stone or small tray for about 15 mins. Remove, cool slightly & enjoy!

DO I HAVE TO BAKE IN A DUTCH OVEN?

Baking in a dutch oven is my preferred method to bake sourdough. However, baking on a baking stone with boiling water in an oven proof dish on bottom rack works very well too. The choice is ultimately yours.

SCORE & BAKE- VIDEO

GRAB YOUR FREE BAKING TIMELINE!

I’ve made an easy to follow baking timeline that includes options for baking same day, the next day and even baking while working full-time! Click on the image below and enter your email address. I’ll immediately send you your FREE Baking Timeline!

This incredibly easy to follow gluten free sourdough recipe includes follow along videos that will show you how to make a gluten free sourdough bread loaf from scratch! This gluten free sourdough recipe is vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter and baking a beautiful gluten free artisan sourdough break loaf! gluten free sourdough bread recipe, sourdough bread recipe, sourdough, gluten free sourdough, gluten free baking. Get your free baking timeline.

FOLLOW ME

Please follow me on Pinterest

Already on Pinterest? Please feel free to PIN the picture below for future reference & so others can find it too 🙏🏻

This incredibly easy to follow gluten free sourdough recipe includes follow along videos that will show you how to make a gluten free sourdough bread loaf from scratch! This gluten free sourdough recipe is vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter and baking a beautiful gluten free artisan sourdough break loaf! gluten free sourdough bread recipe, sourdough bread recipe, sourdough, gluten free sourdough, gluten free baking.
PLEASE PIN ME!

CAN I FREEZE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD?

ABSOLUTELY! As with most sourdough bread, gluten free sourdough is best in the 1st 2 days and can be left at room temperature in a brown paper bag or wrapped in a towel. If you won’t consume it within 2 days, please do slice it up & freeze it!

TO FREEZE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD

To freeze your loaf, make sure it is fully cooled then slice and wrap each slice in either parchment or plastic wrap before placing in an airtight container and freezing. This will prevent freezer burn & should stay fresh for a good 2 weeks!

TO THAW GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD

Simply take individual slices out of freezer and thaw on counter overnight. I find it best to toast them slightly to gain the best taste & texture. You can also pop them directly into the toaster from the freezer, you’ll likely need to toast it twice!

DO I REALLY NEED TO WEIGH THE INGREDIENTS?

Yes! I have learn’t through experience that weighing ingredients using a scale whilst baking is super important and will allow you to reproduce great results every time! I’ve attempted measuring out the flours by volume (e.g. cups), then double checked the weights of each. They were off by quite a lot actually! It can mean the difference between the most incredible and beautiful looking bagel, to one that quite literally flops. The density of the ingredient makes a BIG difference in the volume of the flour. A new bag of flour may be packed down tight vs an already opened one. A gram will always be a gram of flour!

A KITCHEN SCALE IS WORTH THE INVESTMENT

I use a very simple mini digital kitchen scale that I got for $19.99. Trust me it is well worth the investment! It is super easy to measure ingredients by weight. It’s WAY easier than measuring by volume (e.g. cups). To measure flour, place a bowl on the scale, press the tare button to zero your scale to the weight of the bowl, and then add your flour. Simple as that!

PLEASE RATE & COMMENT

I sure do hope you love this gluten free sourdough bread loaf recipe and agree that it is “just like the real thing!” If you try it, please add a comment & a rating onto the recipe below or at the bottom of the post as it helps Google recognize the recipe & my website which will help show it to more people. I’d love to see our community grow!

Thank you once again for your readership & support.

Now let’s get baking!

Hugs from Trish
This incredibly easy to follow gluten free sourdough recipe includes follow along videos that will show you how to make a gluten free sourdough bread loaf from scratch! This gluten free sourdough recipe is vegan (no eggs, no dairy), allergen-friendly, refined sugar-free, oat-free, gum-free, soy-free, and nut-free! Please follow along with me as I share with you my intuitive approach to building & maintaining a sourdough starter and baking a beautiful gluten free artisan sourdough break loaf! gluten free sourdough bread recipe, sourdough bread recipe, sourdough, gluten free sourdough, gluten free baking.

HOW TO MAKE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD THE EASY WAY!

This incredibly easy to follow gluten free sourdough bread recipe includes follow along videos that will show you how to make gluten free sourdough bread from scratch!
5 from 4 votes
COMMENT to let us know you liked it!
Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Resting Time: 15 hours
Total Time: 2 days
Servings: 12

Equipment Needed

  • 1 Stand Mixer optional
  • 1 Dutch Oven or Baking Stone
  • 1 Banneton (6.5-8" = 16-20cm) or Soup Bowl with lint free towel
  • 1 Bowl with lid or Ziplock bag fits banneton or soup bowl inside
  • 1 Bread Lame or sharp knife
  • Parchment Paper optional
  • 2 Ice cubes or spray bottle with water
  • 1 small clear container with lid optional – for the sample dough
Author: Trish

INGREDIENTS
 

To REACTIVATE your starter

  • 75 g Sorghum Flour or Brown Rice Flour to feed your starter
  • 75 g Warm Water (tepid or slightly warm to the touch) filtered or sat on counter 24 hours
  • 15 g Gluten Free Sourdough Starter can be cold or room temp

For the LEAVEN

  • 150 g Active Gluten Free Sourdough Starter @ PEAK see post for details
  • 60 g Brown Rice Flour superfine (or ground as fine as possible)
  • 90 g Warm Water (tepid or slightly warm to the touch) filtered or sat on counter 24 hours

For the SOAKER

  • 55 g Sorghum Flour
  • 50 g Brown Rice Flour superfine (or ground as fine as possible)
  • 65 g White Rice Flour
  • 200 g Warm Water (tepid or slightly warm to the touch) filtered or sat on counter 24 hours

For the GEL

  • 100 g Aquafaba (or water) see post for details
  • 30 g Extra Virgin Olive Oil (or water) optional (see post for details)
  • 18 g Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 16 g Pure Maple Syrup
  • 9 g Kosher Salt or Sea Salt
  • 20 g Psyllium Husk (whole)

For the STARCHES

  • 55 g Tapioca Starch aka Tapioca Flour
  • 90 g Potato Starch can sub with arrowroot powder

INSTRUCTIONS

REACTIVATE STARTER – EVENING BEFORE YOU BAKE

  • Feed your gluten free starter (either cold from refrigerator or room temp) a ratio of 1:5:5. Then discard all but 20g of starter. Feed 100g brown rice flour (or sorghum flour), 100g water (105-110g if feeding sorghum flour). Ensure you keep more starter to replenish! Either set aside 10-20g of starter to replenish it now, or replenish later while you mix your leaven. See post for details.
  • Leave fed starter in a warm place (near ideal temp 24°C or 75°F) until it reaches peak activity (usually 8-12 hours after feed) (see post for more details on how to tell when starter peaks).

MIX LEAVEN – when STARTER reaches PEAK activity (Bake day A.M.)

  • Mix peaked starter (active), water & brown rice flour until well incorporated. This is your LEAVEN (aka preferment or active starter) that will be used to leaven (rise) the dough.
  • Leave leaven in a warm place (near ideal temp 24°C or 75°F) until it reaches peak activity (see post for more details on how to tell when leaven peaks). Usually this will take between 2-4 hours.

MIX SOAKER & GEL

  • After mixing leaven. Sift flours together & mix together all ingredients for soaker (I like to mix in the bowl of my stand mixer). Set aside in a warm place.
  • Mix your gel. Mix all ingredients in the gel together & set aside.

ADD STARCHES & MIX DOUGH – when LEAVEN reaches PEAK activity (2-4 hours after mixing)

  • Add peaked leaven, gel & sifted starches to your soaker (in the bowl of a stand mixer). Mix on low-medium for 2 mins until combined. Then increase speed to medium-high for another 5-10 mins until dough comes together nicely.

SHAPE DOUGH & PLACE INTO BANNETON OR BOWL

  • Very lightly dust countertop with brown rice flour. Use a spatula or a bench scaper to make a dough ball & then transfer to countertop. Gently shape dough into a ball ensuring to close all seams. Remove a small piece of dough for your sample (see post & video for more details).
  • Dust your banneton (or soup bowl lined with towel) generously with brown rice flour. Gently flip dough into banneton or soup bowl top side down. Place banneton or bowl into an airtight container or ziplock bag.

REST & CHILL

  • Bulk ferment your dough (aka REST) covered for about 2 hours in a warm place. See post for list of signs that your dough is finished its "REST" time.
  • CHILL the dough in refrigerator for 30mins (if baking same day) or overnight if you wish to bake the next morning. See post & video for details.
  • BAKING TODAY – PREHEAT OVEN with dutch oven or baking stone inside, to 475°F (246°C) convection setting, while dough is chilling for 30 mins. No convection. Increase temp (500°F or 260°C) & or increase bake time slightly.

SCORE & BAKE

  • Once oven has preheated for 30 mins, remove dough from refrigerator. Use parchment paper to gently flip dough out and onto countertop (top of loaf now facing up).
  • Spray loaf with a little water (optional) then dust generously with brown rice flour. Score loaf at a 45° angle to the surface. See video for more details. Remember to score your sample too!
  • Gently lift dough into the dutch oven, cover & place on center rack. TURN OVEN DOWN to convection 450°F (232°C) & BAKE covered for 45 mins (as little as 35 mins for a softer crumb & crust). No convection (475°F or 246°C).
  • Bake your sample dough on a baking stone or tray for about 15-20mins. Remove, cool for 10 mins, slice and enjoy!
  • After 45 mins, uncover dutch oven, turn dutch oven 180° & bake for another 35-45 mins uncovered.

COOL THEN ENJOY

  • Make sure to let your beautiful artisan loaf cool for at least 2-3 hours or even overnight before cutting into it. The gluten free sourdough needs to completely cool in order to set fully.

Video

Notes

  • Stand mixer is very useful for this recipe but not essential. You can mix by hand but just make sure to mix well until ALL the ingredients are well incorporated & dough comes together nicely (10-15mins).
  • This gluten free sourdough is best slightly warm. I always give mine a slight toasting and it tastes like it came directly out of the oven!
  • CAN I FREEZE MY LOAF?
    Absolutely! As with most sourdough bread, gluten free sourdough is best in the 1st 2 days and can be left at room temperature in a brown paper bag or wrapped in a towel. However, if you won’t consume it within 2 days please do slice it up & freeze it!
    TO FREEZE: Once fully cooled, slice the loaf and wrap each slice in either parchment or plastic wrap before placing in an airtight container and freezing. This will prevent freezer burn & should stay fresh for a good 2 weeks or longer!
    TO THAW: Simply take individual slices out of freezer and thaw on counter overnight. I find it best to toast them slightly to gain the best taste & texture. You can also pop them directly into the toaster from the freezer, you’ll likely need to toast it twice!

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
HOW TO MAKE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD THE EASY WAY!
Serving Size
 
1 slice
Amount per Serving
Calories
163
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
3
g
5
%
Sodium
 
298
mg
13
%
Potassium
 
62
mg
2
%
Carbohydrates
 
32.5
g
11
%
Fiber
 
2.5
g
10
%
Sugar
 
1.1
g
1
%
Protein
 
1.7
g
3
%
Calcium
 
6
mg
1
%
Iron
 
1
mg
6
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Tried this recipe?Please comment to let us know how you liked it!!

PLEASE SHARE THE GLUTEN FREE SOURDOUGH BREAD ♡:

8 Comments

  • Reply
    Jenny
    20 May 2022 at 7:25 AM

    5 stars
    Thanks for getting me started on making fresh bread for my kids (and us adults). Nothing is better. I call this bread inclusive. Lol. Everyone can enjoy.

    • Reply
      Trish
      20 May 2022 at 10:42 AM

      I just LOVE the name! I think I’ll have to make a new loaf called the “inclusive bread” I just LOVE that. Thank you SO much for you comment Jenny! I am just thrilled that you are enjoying it 🥰!

  • Reply
    Bev
    3 May 2022 at 8:34 AM

    5 stars
    Thank you for this!

    • Reply
      Trish
      3 May 2022 at 8:35 AM

      You’re welcome!

  • Reply
    Victoria Addington
    28 April 2022 at 6:09 AM

    It was most captivating when you discussed that a soaker is used to let grains absorb some of the water prior to the dough mixing. My husband prefers a gluten-free sourdough since he is on a diet. I think it’s best for me to buy one in a local bakery since I don’t have any baking skills.

    • Reply
      Trish
      28 April 2022 at 8:07 AM

      Thanks so much for your comment Victoria! I certainly understand that feeling of just wanting to go to a bakery. I tried to make my recipe as easy to follow as possible & provide beginner bakers with everything needed to succeed. You should give it a try! I think you’d love how much better the bread & other baking tastes when it’s homemade with single origin flours! I’m always here to help if you need me ♡.

  • Reply
    Ceclie
    27 April 2022 at 12:07 PM

    5 stars
    I have now had this bread several times and it is delicious. Thanks for breaking it down for us to make it easy to make.

    • Reply
      Trish
      27 April 2022 at 12:08 PM

      Thank you Ceclie, that is so kind of you to say. You are most welcome!

    Leave a Reply

    Recipe Rating




    The maximum upload file size: 512 MB. You can upload: image, video, text. Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded. Drop files here